Sukkot

In our backyards, on our porches, and outside our synagogues, Jews mark the fall harvest by building sturdy—yet fragile—structures out of natural materials, symbolizing both human vulnerability and God’s protection. No harvest holiday is complete without its fertility symbols, and Sukkot—when we wave the lulav and etrog—is no exception. Welcome Jewish women from throughout the ages into your sukkah as ushpizot, honored guests. Enjoy the crisp autumn air as you decorate your sukkah, then spend time with friends and family, celebrating your blessings and committing to sharing your bounty with others.

Latest Rituals

A new tikkun to add meaning to the traditional ritual.
lulav and etrog
“In Hebrew, shakan, dwelling place, often referred to a royal residence. / The rabbis gave it a feminine ending: Shekhinah. Divine mother.”
womans eye visible behind giant ferns
“Every day we exist inside unfinished business.”
woman in profile holding tree branch
“…I wish to take a redcedar frond, salal and spirea, and pacific crab apple and bring them together…”
redcedar branches
“The quest for wisdom, / The struggle for justice”
interior of a sukkah with table covered in blue tablecloth and sunlight creating shadows on a white wall
“May we taste and smell the beauty around us”
lulav and etrog
“Grief and memory hold hands / as, broken-hearted, we find our way through the Jewish year”
sign in hebrew that reads "yizkor" memorial - black letters on white stone
“Whose breath is upon my skin?”
group of people decorating a sukkah
Sukkot activities to spur dialogue on hunger in America
three people building sukkah

Bringing mindfulness to the act of welcoming guests through a chant and series of ritual intentions

Eight Ritual Steps of Hakhnasat Orkhim (Welcoming Guests)

The Reconstructionist Network

Dreaming Our Ancestors Home: Connecting With and Healing Our Past

Connect with your ancestral lineage through active waking and sleeping dreamwork. Guided mediations using active dreamwork, time travel to the past and future, and opportunities to engage in dream circles with the class as a whole and in hevruta will be part of the sessions. Four sessions starting March 19.

Get the latest from Ritualwell

Subscribe for the latest rituals, online learning opportunities, and unique Judaica finds from our store.