Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, is the first of the High Holy Days or Yamim Noraim (Days of Awe). It weds seriousness with celebration and begins the 10 days of repentance that culminate in Yom Kippur. The new year focuses our attention on themes of judgment, repentance, memory, and the divine presence in the world. At the same time, Rosh Hashanah invites us to celebrate birth and creation on many levels. The liturgy suggests that Rosh Hashanah commemorates the creation of the world. Family-oriented services often include a birthday cake for the world—a big hit for kids of all ages! We dip apples in honey to emphasize the sweetness of starting the cycle of seasons once again, and eat round challot to remind us of the cycles of life. The Torah and Haftarah readings for the holiday also address birth and the preciousness of all human life. These stories remind us that the arrival of every child—each and every one of us—is a promise for a renewed world. We renew ourselves at Rosh Hashanah in order to reconnect with this promise and to help ourselves fulfill it in the year ahead.

Latest Rituals

“the earth is my holiest holy”
light brown skinned woman with dark hair in pink t-shirt sitting in meditation position in brightly lit green field overlooking sunrise and mountains in the distance
“Who is responsible for my hurt?”
person wearing white shirt out in a field with palm on their own heart
“Pay attention. This is not a test.”
person in silhouette blowing shofar against white curtains
Acknowledging the loneliness of being unable to pray in community
person in red hoodie walking through field of tall wheat looking out to sunset in the distance
“Blessed are you for bending time”
half moon titled in blue purple sky
“We welcome those who join us virtually on these days”
person having online call or meeting with someone on the computer. live person is shown with hand as if gesturing in conversation. person on computer is smiling.
“Why make my descendants suffer like that?”
woman in a desert with mounds of sand shown with shadows. she is small and far away in the scene.
“My dear, there are no keys to the palace”
light brown skinned woman with curly dark hair dressed in gauzy gown looking contemplative in halo-like crown with hair pinned up and curls coming down in field with tree and sunlight
“May the seeds of this year / Be planted”
closeup of white hand holding seed packet pouring seeds into garden container near soil
“Forgive me and help me to forgive myself and others”
white woman with eyes closed immersed in water, half her face submerged, smiling

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